F-gases certification

F-gases certification

We at Cooper and Hunter are happy to provide transparency.

That is why we inform you of current legislation and regulations.
So that you can make an informed choice for a safe installation by a recognized installer.

For installation companies, some laws and regulations apply that must be met by accredited installers.
On this page we tell you more about these quality marks and the STEK certificate.
Of course, the entire ZZP team of Cooper and Hunter is in possession of the necessary diplomas and they have the right to wear these quality marks.

If you want to know more about these labels and laws and regulations, please read on.


Stek transition to F-gas regulation since 01-01-2010

If you have an air conditioner installed, this technician must of course be authorized to perform certain actions.
The rule was before 01-01-2010 that it had to be in possession of a STEK certification, this rule has been transferred to a European legislation the F-gas regulation this to fitters responsible to deal with refrigerant and air conditioning installations.

All ZZPers with whom we work together are in possession of the F-gases certification Click and drag to move

 


Laws and regulations

Anyone who has to deal with refrigeration technology (technicians, refrigeration installation companies, the owner / installation manager) has to deal with regulations that apply to the installation or work on it.
Due to ever-increasing globalization, it is sometimes unclear which regulations apply and what consequences this has for you. Below you will find a brief overview of the relevant publications and decisions.

Montreal Protocol:

This is an international treaty designed to protect the ozone layer. This treaty also includes the phasing out of the production of a number of substances that are believed to affect the ozone layer. The treaty was signed on September 16, 1987 and became effective on January 1, 1989.

European regulation 2037/2000:

This publication mainly concerns the phasing out of ozone-depleting substances in cooling technology and mainly concerns rules on the phasing out of CFCs and HCFCs. This publication is based on the Montreal protocol.

Designation Regulation Stichting Erkenningsregeling for the performance of the Koeltechnisch Installatiebedrijf:

After the entry into force of the Montreal Protocol, the Netherlands has decided, in anticipation of European regulations, to draw up national regulations that regulate ozone-depleting substances.

The Stichting Erkenningsregeling for the Exercising of the Koeltechnisch Installatiebedrijf (STEK) in The Hague was designated in 1992 as an institution, referred to in Article 13, first paragraph, of the Decree on substances that affect the ozone layer (1995). Since 2010, this regulation has been founded in the European F-Gas Regulation and in the Netherlands through the ministerial regulation
Implementation regulation for fluorinated greenhouse gases and controlled substances environmental management.

This sets out the minimum requirements that apply within Europe, supplemented by additional provisions as stated by the Netherlands. These requirements apply to: installation companies, fitters, examination bodies and inspection authorities. Furthermore, we will discuss extensively which installations fall under this regulation.
In addition to the implementation regulation, there is a Guide for Examinating Authorities and Guidelines for the certification, interim evaluation and reinspection of companies.
It describes what an exam and inspection authority must meet.

Kyoto Protocol:

Prepared in 1997 in the Japanese city of Kyoto and regulates the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. With the treaty, industrialized countries have agreed to reduce greenhouse gas emissions - including carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), nitrous oxide (N2O) and a number of fluorine compounds (CFCs, PFCs and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) in 2008-2012 by an average of 5.2%). reduced compared to 1990 levels. On 16 February 2005 the Kyoto Protocol officially entered into force.

European regulation 842/2006:

This publication is mainly about fluorocarbons (HFCs) and describes what needs to be met when using these substances. The regulation also sets requirements for training, company certification, reporting and maintenance of installations. This regulation is based on the Kyoto protocol.

In the Netherlands this regulation is implemented via the Ministerial Regulation. The implementation is at VROM / SenterNovem.
Implementation regulation for fluorinated greenhouse gases and controlled substances environmental management

This sets out the minimum requirements that apply within Europe, supplemented by additional provisions as stated by the Netherlands. These requirements apply to: installation companies, fitters, examination bodies and inspection bodies, and the installations that fall under this scheme are discussed extensively.Addition to the implementation regulation, there is an Examinations Authority and Guidance Guideline for the certification, interim evaluation and reinspection of companies.It is described in which an exam and inspection authority must comply.European regulation 97/23 / EC: Popularly called the PED (Pressure Equipment Directive). These regulations contain requirements with which pressure equipment must comply. The underlying idea behind these regulations is to eliminate trade barriers within Europe. This regulation came into force in the Netherlands as a Commodities Act Decree on Pressure Equipment. In the Commodities Act Decree on pressure equipment the following topics are described: Which installations fall under this regulation. Requirements that the design and manufacture of an installation must meet. Registration for inspection and application of the CE marking on the installation. Description of the documentation and material type approval. Requirements for inspection bodies (NOBO, notified body) Description for commissioning and inspection obligation of installations.

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